Forgotten Albums: Steve Forbert, Streets of This Town

Like my college, the church I attend has gone the Zoom route for gathering dispersed people for face-to-face conversations. Our minister isn’t doing live services–he’s working with congregants to piece together abbreviated services that are recorded in advance–but today a couple of the adult Sunday School classes got together over Zoom for a while. It’s good to see people’s faces and hear their voices after weeks away from one another (the same holds true for my students–I’m not having class per se online, just Q & A sessions at our regularly scheduled meeting times–I may be a little surprised at how much of a lift I’m getting from interacting with them).

But this morning, rather than watch the pre-recorded service with Martha, I was in the basement gathering thoughts about my next set of Calculus II notes and videos (if you’ve been wondering what my voice sounds like, my YouTube handle is cayleytable–there’s some really enthralling calculus content there, letmetellya) and attending the church of Steve Forbert, specifically his 1988 album Streets of This Town. A couple of songs from it have been knocking around my head as of late, resonating with how I’m feeling about the current times. Streets was a comeback album of sorts, Forbert’s first release in several years. It didn’t sell all that much, but the little buzz it generated reached my eyes or ears; I got it through Columbia House as I was building my nascent CD collection.

Here are a few selections.

Track 3 is “I Blinked Once.” So much feels impermanent right now.

My two favorite tracks are the ones that would have been side-enders had I bought it on vinyl. “As We Live and Breathe” is truly uplifting to listen to, and it offers me some small measure of hope today.

“Hope, Faith, and Love” is another cut that reminds me to look for the good out there.

It was the rocker “Wait a Little Longer” that flitted through my brain this morning and led to this post today.

The CD ends with the quiet “Search Your Heart.” “Don’t take gloom for granted/And don’t bridge time to time/And if you search your heart/You’ll ease your mind.”

So ended the sermon. I’ll try to take what I can from it and go forth to be as good a math professor and person as I can be in the coming weeks.

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